Our Blogs

Screen Time & Media Use – Figuring it Out

Using research-based guidelines to make recommendations regarding proper use of our expanding technology for children is a fast moving target. Recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in 2011 limiting or restring screen time for children was based on literature that is now 10 years old (before iPads and smart phones.) Exposure to screen-based technology is pervasive, and we now know that the type and format of the technology can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on children at different ages. In an attempt to stay current in this area, the AAP sponsored a symposium earlier this year to…

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Docs in the Park Summer Events

Frederick County Pediatrics is proud of its collaboration with Frederick County Parks and Recreation in planning and promoting Docs in the Park, and we want to highlight two upcoming events that children and families can enjoy! Docs in the Park Nature Series Get up close and personal as we check out various county parks with a 90 minute guided tour with a Parks and Recreation Naturalist!  It’s a great way for families of all ages to get outside, see our parks and learn more about the world around.  Who knows, maybe you’ll see one of us out there. Below are…

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Vaccines – Protecting our children, protecting our community

Re-occurrence of preventable childhood illnesses has again made national headlines with measles and whooping cough (pertussis) resurging across the country. This has occurred as a result of under-vaccination – unfortunately deliberately in many situations where parents have elected to delay or not vaccinate their children. As you can see, the ripple effect of this decision is concerning and has far reaching effects for all of us. We, FCP, want to reinforce our strong support, trust and belief in our current national vaccine program and strongly support the CDC and AAP guidelines for proper and timely vaccination. We further want to…

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The Gifts of Childhood and Parenthood (a Pediatric Sermon)

Welcome to 2015. For me, this year will take me back to my roots in pediatrics as I am about to become a grandfather- of twins, no less! As I talked to my son and daughter-in-law about their impending parenthood and all the preparations and expectations of childbirth and baby care, I was struck by how quickly we can get caught up in the “how to” part of being parents and pass over the “why” and even more importantly the joy that parenthood can and should bring us. So for the moment, let’s take a look at the preface of…

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Update on AAP Policy Statement – Insufficient Sleep & Recommendations for School Start Times for Adolescents

Insufficient sleep in teens has become a hot topic lately but for good reason- it’s a serious problem that has both medical and psychological implications as well as a potential impact on learning. Adequate sleep has not received the medical credit it deserves. Many of us don’t view sleep importantly and in our busy worlds it can be marginalized. But the impact of a chronic lack of sleep, especially in teenagers, is becoming more clear and important. Teens need more, not less, sleep as their bodies (and minds) are rapidly changing and growing. We also know that teen’s “sleep cycles”…

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Pediatric Respiratory Virus- Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68)

Many of you have heard and inquired about a respiratory illness caused by a seasonal virus known as Enterovirus D68 (EV D68). Currently, it is affecting children in the Midwest and there have been no documented cases in Maryland.  Enterovirus is seasonal and is most common in summer and early fall. It passes through our community each year and in general it is a mild disease with young children being most susceptible.  EV-D68 primarily causes respiratory illness. At its onset, EV-D68 may start off as an innocent viral illness but can progress to acute respiratory symptoms. Asthmatics and children with…

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ADHD – Enhancing our Understanding

As a pediatrician, I constantly receive and review new information and updates on the spectrum of ADHD in children and adolescents. Making an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan using the best evidence-based information (with support of AAP guidelines and updates) is an important professional responsibility for me. A recent practice guidelines article appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine (2/27/14) which had some very appropriate key points which I felt were worth sharing: 1) ADHD is the most common neurobehavioral disorder in children with occurrence rates between 5-10 %. ADHD has been found to be a more chronic and…

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Childhood Obesity

Moving into the second decade of management Childhood obesity has been identified as a serious health concern for more than a decade and yet we continue to struggle with both, proper early identification and appropriate long term prevention and management.  We’ve come to understand that although obesity is a patient-specific problem, its solution and implications are cultural and public health based. Where do we stand now – what do we know – where are we going? Childhood obesity has climbed to the # 1 health concern of parents, surpassing drugs, smoking and safety. We clearly understand the medical and non-medical…

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The Stuttering Child

The Stuttering Foundation recently published a professional guide for pediatricians regarding stuttering. It’s an excellent resource for any family that is dealing with stuttering, and I would encourage you to review it. For those with concerns that your child stutters or is at risk for stuttering, here are the following risk factors: A positive family history of stuttering Age of onset after age 3 ½ years Stuttering has persisted for 6-12 months or longer Male sex Other (developmental) speech/language concerns or difficulty being understood   The publication includes medical guidelines for referral, suggestions for parents and a CD for how…

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Sinusitis – Refining the Diagnosis

Acute bacterial sinusitis is a complication of a viral upper respiratory infection and/or allergies (hay fever). Approximately 10% of pediatric patients presenting with upper respiratory symptoms have clinically defined sinusitis. The accuracy of the diagnosis and subsequent decision making regarding treatment, including antibiotics, continues to be a challenging and actively evaluated area of pediatric research. The AAP recently published updated guidelines to help clinicians best diagnose and treat this common problem. The guidelines outline 3 different “presentations” that can assist in more accurately diagnosing sinusitis: 1) a persistent illness of nasal congestion/ discharge or cough lasting > 10 days, 2)…

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Community Programs

Docs in the Park Reach out and Read Girls on the Run United Way of Frederick Maryland Interagency Early Childhood Committee Mental Health Association LiveWell Frederick Family Resource, Information & Education Network for Down Syndrome
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